środa, 26 marca 2014

Fisherman's Bastion, Budapest, Hungary

Fisherman’s Bastion in Budapest is one of the top Budapest attractions without a doubt. The present day lovely lookout towers / decorative fortification of Fisherman’s Bastion were built in the 19th century to serve as a lookout tower for the best panoramic views in Budapest, Hungary. Needless to say, there used to be real castle walls where now you can take fantastic photos from, but the present day structure has never served as an actual fortification in Buda.

The views from the Fisherman’s Bastion well deserve their own special tower atop the Buda Castle Hill, as not only the Buda Castle but also the river views and the Danube riverfront sights are now part of the UNESCO World Heritage.

czwartek, 20 marca 2014

The garden of the Nezu Museum, Japan

The site of the museum and garden used to be his private residence, which he bought in 1906. After his death in 1940, his son founded the museum to preserve the collection. In World War II however, the museum and gardens were severly destroyed.

The hilly garden has two ponds that are connected by small streams. Upon every turn of the numerous winding paths, you can see a new garden lantern, memorial stone, Buddha or Kan'non statue. The garden also has some well-preserved tea houses. Near the main building, you can find a modern cafe. 

środa, 5 marca 2014

Hidcote Manor, UK

Hidcote Manor Garden is a garden in Britain, located at Hidcote Bartrim village, near Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire. It is one of the best-known and most influential Arts and Crafts gardens in Britain, with its linked "rooms" of hedges, rare trees, shrubs and herbaceous borders.

Lawrence Johnston was influenced in creating his garden at Hidcote by the work of Alfred Parsons and Gertrude Jekyll, who were designing gardens of hardy plants contained within sequences of outdoor "rooms". The theme was in the air: Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicholson's Sissinghurst Castle Garden was laid out as a sequence of such spaces, without, it seems, direct connection with the reclusive and shy Major Johnston. Hidcote's outdoor "rooms" have various characters and themes, achieved by the use of box hedges, hornbeam and yew, and stone walls. These rooms, such as the 'White Garden' and 'Fuchsia Garden' are linked, some by vistas, and furnished with topiaries. Some have ponds and fountains, and all are planted with flowers in bedding schemes. They surround the 17th century manor house, and there are a number of outhouses and a kitchen garden.